Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

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Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby kitkit123 on Tue Feb 21, 2012 4:58 pm

Has there ever been testing with the OutBack FX and CC and Magnetic Pulse such as in solars flares or nuclear blasts.
If so what was the outcome?

Thanks
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby Gordon-Loomberah on Tue Feb 21, 2012 7:11 pm

My FM80 has performed flawlessly during all solar flares that have occured during the past couple of years. Fortunately, no one has set off any nuclear bombs nearby, so I cant comment on that!
http://gunagulla.com Loomberah weather + solar radiation and UV, and astronomy
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby SteveHiggins on Wed Feb 22, 2012 7:26 am

Not to Sound Smart.... If your FM or FX dies because of a Nuclear blast, you've got much bigger problems than the lack of power.

No the FM's,MX's, or the FX's are not EMP protected.... To do so would make the costs of the inverter much higher than most customers would want spend on a COTS inverter.
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby tallgirl on Wed Feb 29, 2012 7:50 pm

SteveHiggins wrote:Not to Sound Smart.... If your FM or FX dies because of a Nuclear blast, you've got much bigger problems than the lack of power.

No the FM's,MX's, or the FX's are not EMP protected.... To do so would make the costs of the inverter much higher than most customers would want spend on a COTS inverter.


Nukes are not the EMP monsters people make them out to be. The atmospheric test shots that caused all the problems in Hawaii (and elsewhere) did NOT wipe out all electronic equipment anywhere near where the shot was detonated.

Have a read -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starfish_Prime
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby festus on Sat Mar 24, 2012 3:48 pm

Of course, a nuclear event does not need to be near in order to represent a threat to electrical systems as voltage sensitive as the components of our OutBack systems. A detonation at elevation could, as it did in the 1962 test alluded to earlier, create powerful magnetic fields hundreds of miles distant without representing physical danger of any sort yet deliver much more energy than a transistor is designed to withstand. As so many of our systems are connected to the grid, they would certainly fry if within the radius of such effects. So I think the question is, while theoretical, worthy of discussion. Would an online UPS really add so much to the cost of a backup system, given how expensive the investment is to begin with?
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby tallgirl on Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:47 pm

If you look at what =actually= happened with Starfish Prime, it was not nearly the disaster that it's been hyped to have been.

Most of the EMP hype comes from people who haven't studied the actual events that did produce EMP. Or else they ignore what would happen if a nuke were actually set off close enough to cause problems.

If you are seriously concerned, you need to be able to shield the entire system, including any conductors feeding =out= of the system. Which means leaving your entire system, and all the appliances that are plugged into it, completely disconnected, at all times. Because you never know when someone is going to set off a nuke.
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Re: Testing of Outback products & Magnetic pulses

Postby Defender on Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:05 am

I see these questions about EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) from time to time and it is mostly based on misinformation and watching shows like "24". There are three major sources of EMP that one might encounter: nuclear bomb explosion, high power transmitter, and solar flares. The nuclear bomb EMP, usually described as being detonated as an airburst over a target area, generates an electromagnetic pulse (as well as blast waves, radiation, etc.) which propagates outward around the speed of light, but its intensity drops off rapidly according to the inverse of the range squared. So what that means is that if the bomb goes off 10,000 meters from you (6+ miles or 32,000 feet), the energy of the EMP (whatever it was to start with, which depends upon the bomb specs), will only be one hundred millionth of its original energy by the time it reaches your equipment. Nuclear EMP blasts are designed to take out sensitive communications front ends (military receivers) and similar electronics. They won't burn out the alternator coils in your car. Confounding this is the fact that much electronics is shielded in a "Faraday cage" (a metal box) which blocks the EMP energy. Also a factor, is the impedance of the system. Most of your solar backup system is relatively low impedance. If you've got nuclear bombs going off within 6 miles of your location, you probably don't need to be staying in that location to use your backup power system anyway.

The second EMP source is from transmitters designed to destroy electronics. Also developed by the military, these would be focused transmission of high energy at short ranges. Unless shielded, they will fry your stuff, but you've got to be on someone's no-fly or terrorism list to get a visit from one of those, and presently, that kind of weapon is mostly "research" and not widely deployed.

Then there are solar flares. These have been devastating in the Northern reaches of the US and Canada due to more grid presence there and the shape of the Earth's magnetic field which funnels the energy into the poles. The main reason that solar flare EMPs are a problem is that we have strung immense antenna arrays up across the landscape (i.e., the power distribution grid) which can have tremendous currents induced into them from space. These currents blow up transformers and can bring down the gird. You may notice that telegraph wires along a train track or highway swap sides on the poles periodically. This is to create what amounts to a "twisted pair" of wires to mitigate the effects of induced currents from things like solar flares. From the standpoint of risk to your solar backup system, I wouldn't really worry. Most small (not widely distributed) systems that would be run by individuals, afford too small an aperture to experience an over-current event from a solar flare. If the solar flare is large enough to burn out your solar backup system, then you've probably got bigger problems to deal with if you are even alive to deal with them.

So, if you are still concerned about these sources, enclose your entire system (inverters, batteries, computers, charge controllers, etc.) in a grounded cage (either solid or tight mesh) and maybe build it underground in your basement; run all wires in and out of the system through grounded metal conduit; put additional metal oxide varistors (MOV) or other surge protectors on all incoming and outgoing lines and distribute them at the loads... then, what to do about the solar panels?? Everything I can think of would decrease solar efficiency, but I would imagine that one could enclose them in a grounded wire mesh which allowed sunlight to penetrate, or perhaps spray on an optically transmissive conductive coating that is then grounded. Alternately, store spare shielded panels that you can break out after the war is over and you are the last human left on the planet with a working coffee maker.

Rather than worrying about EMP, I would be far more concerned about Lightning Strikes (direct or near your solar array, or coming in from the grid).
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